Mineral Information and Data:

Halite
NaCl [CNMNC approved formula]

Named From Greek hals = salt.

IMA status : Valid species (Pre-IMA Ancient) Grandfathered
CLASSIFICATION 
Dana
(8th edition) :
09.01.01.01  
  (09) Anhydrous and Hydrated Halides
  (09.01) where A X
  (09.01.01) Halite Group
  
Nickel-Strunz
(10th edition) :
03.AA.20
  (03) Halides
  (03.A) Simple Halides, Without H2O
  (03.AA) M:X = 1:1, 2:3, 3:5, etc.
  
Crystal system: Cubic System
Point group (H-M): m3m (or 4/m 3 2/m) — hexoctahedral
Unit cell: a = 5.640 วบ
Crystal Habit: Crystals cubic, rarely octahedral, often hopper-shaped or cavernous; massive compact or granular
  
Color: Colorless, white, yellow, orange, reddish, purple, blue
Diaphaneity: Transparent
Luster: Vitreous
Hardness (Mohs): 2
Measured Density: 2.17 g/cm3
Cleavage: 1; {001} perfect
Tenacity: Brittle
Fracture: Conchoidal
Streak: White
  
Geologic Setting: Typically in sedimentary rocks of evaporite association, may form immense beds; also as volcanic sublimates, efflorescences, cave deposits. Crystals are common in multiphase fluid inclusions; may be included in other minerals as a product of intermediate-grade metamorphism.
Mineral Association: Sylvite, polyhalite, kieserite, carnallite, gypsum, anhydrite, dolomite
Ore deposits: Major source of chlorine.
  
Synonyms/varieties: Rock salt
Luminescent Properties: Rarely fluoresces red under SW UV.
Other Properties: H2O Soluble. Gemstone Readily Available. BioMineral.
Comments: Saline taste.

 

Halite
Origin: Searles Lake, San Bernardino Co., California, U.S.A.
Sample size: crystals about 1-1.5 cm
Photo and Owner: Milton Speckels

 

Halite
Hopper crystals
Origin: Searless Lake, Trona, San Bernardino Co., California, USA
Sample size: 5 x 5 x 4 cm
Photo: Tom Loomis

 

Halite
Origin: Bergmannssegen, Lehrte/Hannover, Germany
Sample size: 5 x 5 x 2 cm
Photo: Tom Loomis

 

Halite
Origin: Wielickzka, Poland
Picture height: 23 mm
Sample owner: M.A. Zakrzewski
Photo: Pieter Stemvers, Leusden, Netherlands

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