Mineral Information and Data:

Chrysocolla
(Cu,Al)2H2Si2O5(OH)4 • nH2O [CNMNC approved formula]

Named from the Greek chrysos - "gold" and kolla - "glue" in allusion to the name of the material used to solder gold. Known since antiquity 315BC. Approved and defined (IMA, 1971).

IMA status : Approved Species 1971 ()
CLASSIFICATION 
Dana
(8th edition) :
74.03.02.01  
  (74) Phyllosilicate Modulated Layers
  (74.03) with joined strips
  (74.03.02)
  
Nickel-Strunz
(10th edition) :
09.ED.20
  (09) Silicates
  (09.E) Phyllosilicates
  (09.ED) Phyllosilicates with kaolinite layers composed of tetrahedral and octahedral nets
  
Crystal system: Orthorhombic System
Point group (H-M): Unknown — Unk
Unit cell: a = 5.72-5.92Å, b = 17.7-18.0Å, c = 8.00-8.28Å
Crystal Habit: Crystals acicular, to 5 mm, in radiating clusters; fine fibrous, botryoidal, earthy; commonly cryptocrystalline, opaline, or enamel-like.
  
Color: Blue, blue-green, or green; brown to black when impure
Diaphaneity: Translucent to opaque
Luster: Vitreous, porcelaneous, earthy
Hardness (Mohs): ~ 2 - 4
Measured Density: 1.93 - 2.4 g/cm3
Tenacity: Brittle to somewhat sectile
Fracture: Conchoidal
Streak: White when pure
  
Geologic Setting: In the oxidized portions of many copper deposits.
Mineral Association: Malachite, tenorite, halloysite, nontronite
  

 

Chrysocolla
Chrysocolla, crystals acicular, in radiating clusters.
Origin: Loz Azules, Copiapo, Chile
Sample size: 4.5 x 3 x 2 cm
Photo: Tom Loomis

 

Chrysocolla
(zoom-in of above)

 

Chrysocolla
Botryoidal chrysocolla coated with drusy quartz
Origin: Manto Tres Gracias Mine, Diego de Almagro, Chile
Sample size: 10.5 x 8.0 x 4.7 cm
Photo: Rob Lavinsky

 

Chrysocolla
(zoom-in of above)

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