Mineral Information and Data:

Brucite
Mg(OH)2 [CNMNC approved formula]

Named after the American mineralogist and physician, Archibald Bruce (1777-1818), who first described the species.

IMA status : Valid species (Pre-IMA 1824) Grandfathered
CLASSIFICATION 
Dana
(8th edition) :
06.02.01.01  
  (06) Hydroxides and Oxides Containing Hydroxyl
  (06.02) where X++ (OH)2
  (06.02.01) Brucite group (Rhombohedral: P-3m1)
  
Nickel-Strunz
(10th edition) :
04.FE.05
  (04) Oxides and Hydroxides
  (04.F) Hydroxides (without V or U)
  (04.FE) Hydroxides with OH, without H2O; sheets of edge-sharing octahedra
  
Crystal system: Trigonal System
Point group (H-M): 3m (or 3 2/m) — hexagonal-scalenohedral
Space group: P3m1
Unit cell: a = 3.142(1) Å, c = 4.766(2) Å
Crystal Habit: Crystals tabular {0001}, to 19 cm, in platy or foliated masses and rosettes; also fibrous, to 50 cm; granular, massive.
  
Color: White, pale green, blue, gray; honey-yellow to brownish red and deep brown in manganoan varieties; colorless in transmitted light.
Diaphaneity: Transparent
Luster: Waxy, pearly on cleavage surfaces
Hardness (Mohs): 2.5
Measured Density: 2.39 g/cm3
Cleavage: {0001}, perfect
Tenacity: Sectile; separable plates are flexible, fibers are elastic.
Streak: White
  
Geologic Setting: A common alteration of periclase in marble; a low-temperature hydrothermal vein mineral in metamorphic limestones and chlorite schists; formed during serpentinization of dunites.
Mineral Association: Calcite, aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, hydromagnesite, artinite, talc, chrysotile
  
Other Properties: Pyroelectric. Gemstone Extremely Rare. BioMineral.

 

Brucite
Origin: Woods Chrome Mine, Texas, Lancaster County,
Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
Sample size: 5 x 4 x 2.75 cm
Photo: Rob Lavinsky

 

Brucite
(zoom-in of above)

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