Mineral Information and Data:

Adamite
Zn2AsO4(OH) [CNMNC approved formula]

Named after the French mineralogist Gilbert Joseph Adam (1795-1881) who supplied the first specimens.

IMA status : Valid species (Pre-IMA 1866) Grandfathered
CLASSIFICATION 
Dana
(8th edition) :
41.06.06.03  
  (41) Anhydrous Phosphates Containing Hydroxyl or Halogen
  (41.06) where (A)2 (XO4) Zq
  (41.06.06) Olivenite Group
  
Nickel-Strunz
(10th edition) :
08.BB.30
  (08) Phosphates, Arsenates, Vanadates
  (08.B) Phosphates, etc. with Additional Anions, without H2O
  (08.BB) With only medium-sized cations, (OH, etc.):RO4 about 1:1
  
Crystal system: Orthorhombic System
Point group (H-M): mmm (or 2/m 2/m 2/m) — dipyramidal
Unit cell: a = 8.31 Å, b = 8.51 Å, c = 6.04 Å
Crystal Habit: Crystals varied, commonly elongated along b-axis, tabular or equant, drusy
  
Color: Light yellow, honey yellow, yellowish green, brownish yellow, may be zoned
Diaphaneity: Transparent to translucent
Luster: Vitreous
Hardness (Mohs): 3.5
Measured Density: 4.32 to 4.48 g/cm3
Cleavage: 2; {101} good; {010} poor
Tenacity: Brittle
  
Polymorphism and Series: Dimorphous with paradamite; forms a series with olivenite.
Geologic Setting: A secondary mineral in the oxidized zone of zinc- and arsenic-bearing hydrothermal mineral deposits.
Mineral Association: Smithsonite, hemimorphite, scorodite, olivenite, calcite, quartz, Fe–Mn oxides
  
Other Properties: Gemstone Extremely Rare.

 

Adamite
Origin: Mina Ojuela, Mapimi, Durango, Mexico
Sample size: 8 x 5 x 5 cm

 

Adamite
(zoom-in of above)

 

Adamite
Darker green cuprian adamite crystal aggregates to 2 mm across in limonitic, spongy matrix.
Origin: Gold Hill mine, Tooele Co., Utah, U.S.A.
Sample size: 7 x 5 x3 cm
Photo: Tom Loomis

 

Adamite
(zoom-in of above)

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