Mineral Information and Data:

Andersonite  
Na2Ca(UO2)(CO3)3 • 6H2O [CNMNC approved formula]

Named for Charles Alfred Anderson (1902-1990), geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, who collected the first samples.

IMA status : Valid species (Pre-IMA 1951) Grandfathered
CLASSIFICATION 
Dana
(8th edition) :
15.02.05.01  
  (15) Hydrated Carbonates
  (15.02) where A+m B++n (XO3)p · x(H2O), (m+n):p > 1:1
  (15.02.05)
  
Nickel-Strunz
(10th edition) :
05.ED.30
  (05) Carbonates and Nitrates
  (05.E) Uranyl Carbonates
  (05.ED) UO2:CO3 = 1:3
  
Crystal system: Trigonal System
Point group (H-M): 3 — rhombohedral
Unit cell: a = 18.009 Å, c = 23.838 Å
Crystal Habit: Crystals rhombohedral; clusters of minute pseudo-cubic crystals; thick crusts and veinlets
  
Color: Yellow-green
Diaphaneity: Transparent to translucent
Luster: Vitreous to pearly
Hardness (Mohs): 2.5
Measured Density: 2.8 g/cm3
  
Geologic Setting: An uncommon secondary mineral, formed in the oxidized zone of uranium-bearing hydrothermal polymetallic deposits; may be post-mine, coating walls of mine tunnels.
Mineral Association: Schrockingerite, bayleyite, shwartzite, boltwoodite, liebigite, gypsum
  
Luminescent Properties: Fluoresces bright pale green to yellow-green under SW and LW UV.
Other Properties: Radioactive. H2O Soluble.

 

Andersonite
Origin: Ambrosia Lake area, Grants District, McKinley Co., New Mexico, U.S.A.
Sample size: 6.5 x 5.2 x 2.5 cm
Photo: Dan Weinrich

 

Andersonite
(zoom-in of above)

 

Andersonite
Origin: Repete Mine, Blanding, San Juan Co., Utah, U.S.A.
Sample size: 5.2 x 3.6 x 1.5 cm
Photo: Rob Lavinsky

 

Andersonite
(zoom-in of above)

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